Categories
Fantasy Fiction Literary Fiction

In the Night Wood by Dale Bailey

Title: In the Night Wood

Author: Dale Bailey

Length: 224 pages

Release Date: 10/8/18 (get a copy)!!!

Rating: 4/5 ****

Thank you to NetGalley and John Joseph Adams/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt publishing for the free eARC in exchange for an honest review!

My little summary: “Once upon a time…” a man living near an enchanted wood starts having delusions and writes a book. Many years later, an English scholar bumps into that book and his fate appears to be linked to the Story from that point on. It is a Story (capital Story) within a story… Something I wish the author had pursued more!

The book is more about grief than folklore, but there is a healthy mix of both. Charles and Erin are still reeling from the death of their child and his infidelity. Their marriage is disintegrating and they move to Hollow House trying to start over. When the visions and nightmares and story parallels start…!

In the middle of the book the grief exposition got a bit repetative, but I had no urge to skim pages. My biggest issue was that neither main character showed a tad of growth. Can their relationship change despite ?

I enjoyed learning a lot of new words but some parts seemed unnecessarily complex. It fit with the atmosphere but the writing took a bit of work and a dictionary at times.

Long story short: awesome story! Would recommend to anyone that likes a good fairy tale, atmospheric fiction, folk lore, or a good story in general!

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Categories
Fiction General Fiction Literary Fiction Uncategorized

Review of Pygmy by Chuck Palahniuk

Good evening everyone and welcome back! I finally finished Pygmy by Chuck Palahniuk, has anyone else read this or any of his work?

My first thought about this novel is that it is not a good one to introduce yourself to Palahniuk with. This is an obvious conclusion after getting midway through two chapters. Don’t get me wrong, I loved Invisible Monsters, Fight Club, Diary even, but this book requires warming up to.

This is a satire of American culture, seen through the eyes of a young foreign operative. I would guess Czech Republic or one of those countries. The protagonist is a genius yet supposedly speaks in terrible broken English, in which the entire book is written. I felt like I missed important things due to the way that the language made me want to skim paragraphs. The language is also very repetitive at times.

To the meat though – if you can stomach the shock of a graphic sodomizing, or tolerate the 13 year old’s constant fixation with genitals, the book really is hilarious. Trips to Wal-Mart, religious propaganda outlets, his reverence of great war hero Colonel Sanders, mixed with quotes from all of the European dictators … it all does make for a difficult but entertaining read. The take home point is reading this in the mind frame that it is satire, and taking the recurring shock points for what they are.

I would recommend this for adults who are already Palahniuk fans or like his minimalist style. You can google similar authors faster than I can type them!

Recap: 3/5 stars for difficult structure. Redeeming point is that he managed to make Pygmy out to be a real person with feelings by the end. Also made me alternate between laughing out loud and cringing, at least every chapter.

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Categories
Fiction Literary Fiction

Review: Trail of Broken Wings by Sejal Badani

Happy Sunday and welcome back! Let’s talk about Trail of Broken Wings by Sejal Badani. This was released back in 2015, but if it missed your radar I highly suggest that you go back and do yourself the favor. It was a Goodreads choice best fiction award winner as well, so I am not the only one who loved it!

Long story short, the patriarch of an Indian American family falls into a coma and during the months that he is on life support the family has to come together, then come to terms with their history. There are secrets, buried emotions, traumas, and all the history just waiting to either destroy or rebuild these women anew.

I wouldn’t automatically grab this off the shelf if I didn’t have a sick parent at this time, but if you are a fan of this sort of fiction, a fan of beautiful language, good quotes, strong dialogue, and a flawless editor, please read this book! The language is truly flowing and I managed to read it in about three days. I also learned a lot about Indian culture.

I don’t know if this book might be upsetting to domestic abuse victims, but I do feel like it’s a subject that we shouldn’t shy away from in popular culture. It is a story of healing and coming to terms with the past. Finding ways to put away your fear and pride and loving your family.

Even with some parts being a bit melodramatic I give this a solid 5/5!

As always, please let me know if you stop in! I love feedback and talking books! This is a 100% unsolicited review with no compensation

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